Patience, Creativity and Perseverance

Written by Katie Grenoble '20
The six weeks I spent with physicians and clinical officers in Uganda were a lesson in the fundamentals of medicine. In Uganda, doctors do not enjoy the luxury of being able to order any lab test they may need. Imaging is often performed off-site and rarely returned with an interpretation. Medications are purchased only if the patient can afford them, and the two EKG machines I saw seen were donated by Danbury Hospital in Connecticut.

The Homestay Model of Global Health Science

Video by Kapo Productions
The University of Vermont/Western Connecticut Health Network Global Health Program has a robust partnership with Makerere University College of Health Sciences and Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Learn more about the homestay model visiting medical students experience and meet some of the people who make it happen in this short documentary.

Cui Bono? Who Will Benefit?

Written by Katherine Wang '17 It was the combination of Grey’s Anatomy and Mountains Beyond Mountains that convinced me my senior year of high school to consider medicine as a career—the excitement of the operating room and the journey Paul Farmer took through Haiti and beyond. It obviously was an idealized notion of both surgery and global health, but it shaped my undergraduate experience. I chose to major in anthropology, and enrolled in an introductory writing course in the subject after reading about it in Tracy Kidder’s book.

Witness, Advocate, Exchange, Improve

Written by Ann Dougherty, M.D.'09 On a whiteboard in my office, I have written the words: witness, advocate, exchange and improve. These are my pillars of global health. Witness, don’t rescue. Advocate, for a diversity of backgrounds. Exchange, sustainably and equitably. Improve, building appropriate technology and capacity. These core concepts may seem obvious, but they require training in global health ethics and the realities of on-the-ground work in low-resource settings.