From Culinary Medicine to Health Equity: The Top Blog Posts of 2018

Written by UVM Larner College of Medicine students and alums
As we begin 2019, the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine looks back at some of our most popular posts of the past year. From the benefits of culinary medicine to sage advice to first-year students to alums reporting back from residency, these posts highlight the diversity of experiences students bring to their work and their future careers as physicians. Here are the top five posts of 2018

“Go Out and Heal Some Folks”

By Robert Macauley, M.D.
During the Commencement Ceremony for the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine on May 20, Robert Macauley, M.D., stepped away from the podium to deliver a more intimate address to the Class of 2018. He told a story from the night before his first day of residency, when he was stopped by a police officer whose wise advice would stick with him for decades.

Tips & Pointers for the Fourth-Year of Medical School

Written by Kelsey Sullivan '18
Starting fourth year of medical school is an exciting time. Here at the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, it is really the first time that you have a chance to customize your schedule to your unique interests and aspirations. There are a few things you should keep in mind when getting ready for that last year of your medical school journey.

Match Day 2018 at the Larner College of Medicine

Match Day – the annual rite of passage that ignites a senior medical student’s future – took place on Friday, March 16, 2018. Beginning at noon EDT, medical students in the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine’s Class of 2018 and soon-to-be-doctors from across the U.S. and world learned which U.S. residency program they have been matched to for the next three to seven years.

Empowering Residents to Improve Health Equity

Written by Gaurab Basu, M.D.'10, M.P.H.
In the 19th century, there may have been no more consequential biomedical scientist than Rudolph Virchow. His scientific research at a molecular level has had a profound impact on modern medicine even today, more than 150 years later. For me, however, it is his work in social medicine that has made a lasting impression on my understanding of the responsibilities clinicians have to the health of their society.