Scrubs Addressing the Firearm Epidemic: Speaking Up for Public Health

Written by Rose Martin '22
Andrew Black was a talented athlete and young brewer raised in Essex, Vermont. Late last year, at the age of 23, Andrew died by firearm suicide. Andrew’s death came without warning: he purchased a gun just a few hours before his death. Now, his parents share his story to advocate for a waiting period for firearm purchases in an effort to lower the likelihood of impulsive acts of firearm violence. Read more...

Empowering Residents to Improve Health Equity

Written by Gaurab Basu, M.D.'10, M.P.H.
In the 19th century, there may have been no more consequential biomedical scientist than Rudolph Virchow. His scientific research at a molecular level has had a profound impact on modern medicine even today, more than 150 years later. For me, however, it is his work in social medicine that has made a lasting impression on my understanding of the responsibilities clinicians have to the health of their society.

Launching the American Public Health Association Student Interest Group

Written by Carolyn Payne '18
The American Public Health Association (APHA) is developing a presence at The University of Vermont (UVM). In January, a group of medical students founded the American Public Health Association Student Interest Group (APHA SIG) at the Larner College of Medicine. This was an important step towards ensuring the engagement of Vermont students in community education, political advocacy, and state and national public health initiatives.

“Fake News” or Reputable Science? How to Tell the Difference

Written by UVM Associate Dean for Public Health
Jan Carney, M.D., MPH

By now, we have all heard of “fake news,” but what about “fake science news” – does it exist and how can we differentiate between fact and fiction? In January 2017, The Los Angeles Times wrote about epidemic spread of “fake news” to science and medicine. In February, Academic Medicine sounded a warning to academics everywhere about predatory publishing, an exploding and distracting publication practice characterized by “weak peer review, sloppy science, or even fraud.”

Prevention & Patient Empowerment: Caring for Patients at Risk for HIV/AIDS

Written by Alexandra Miller '18 In the 1980s and 1990s, when HIV/AIDS was stigmatized and poorly understood, the disease was a death sentence. Now, we have available to patients a pre-exposure HIV prophylaxis, known as PrEP, that can prevent HIV transmission, potentially opening the door to immense changes in patients’ lives as well as improved public health outcomes. As part of my public health project, I had the opportunity to survey primary care providers in every county in Vermont to better understand perceived barriers to prescribing PrEP.