Education

Guest Blog Post: 2017 Commencement Class Speaker

Written by Dylan Devlin, M.D.’17
I’ve always wanted to speak at a graduation but have always been passed over by some…valedictorian. I was thrilled to accept, but after doing so I realized that speaking at this graduation would be no small task. As members of the Class of 2017 know, we just might be the greatest class to have ever graduated…at any time…in any field…on any planet. I began to crumble under the pressure knowing that if I disappointed my classmates, I would be disappointing all of humanity. Continue reading

Education

A Day in the Life of a Fourth Year Medical Student: The Road to Match Day

Written by Laurie Griesinger ’17
Laurie Griesinger ’17, a native of South Bend, Indiana, hit the residency interview trail this year, with her sights set on a residency in pathology. Like thousands of her peers, she has interviewed in locations across the country in the months leading up to Match Day on March 17. No two journeys are alike, however. . In the Q&A that follows, Griesinger shares some of the things she learned about herself, as well as some practical advice about parking garages and what to make sure to have in your purse, all gleaned during her months of travel and interviewing. Continue reading

Education

A Day in the Life of a Fourth Year Medical Student: A focus on LGBT-inclusive Education

Written by Nicholas Bonenfant ’17
All fourth year students at the UVM Larner College of Medicine are required to complete either a teaching month or a scholarly project, both to reinforce foundational sciences and to encourage the development of students as physician-scholars. For this scholarly project, Nicholas Bonenfant ’17 has been working with Michael Upton, M.D., assistant professor of psychiatry, to develop a series of educational eModules and presentations on topics related to LGBTQ health issues. He will be matching into pediatrics on Match Day, March 17. Read more in a Q & A with Bonenfant. Continue reading

Global Health

Cui Bono? Who Will Benefit?

Written by Katherine Wang ’17
It was the combination of Grey’s Anatomy and Mountains Beyond Mountains that convinced me my senior year of high school to consider medicine as a career—the excitement of the operating room and the journey Paul Farmer took through Haiti and beyond. It obviously was an idealized notion of both surgery and global health, but it shaped my undergraduate experience. I chose to major in anthropology, and enrolled in an introductory writing course in the subject after reading about it in Tracy Kidder’s book. Continue reading