Trust in Your Fellow Americans: Advocating for DREAMers

Written by Juan Conde '21
What is it like to be a student advocate, to rally for change in society, and to bring attention to the education struggles of undocumented youth? It can be difficult, at times uplifting and at other times dispiriting, but always, at least for me, it has been necessary. I know that most Larner College of Medicine students are passionate about different social issues. We have a tradition of advocacy for many worthy causes, such as expanding access to healthcare, improving health equity, and providing leadership in underserved communities.

Four Years Later: Cultural Understanding in Medical School

Written by Soraiya Thura '18
I’ve grown in many ways during my four years in medical school, but one of the most striking has been related to my cultural competence. When I took the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) as a first-year medical student, my results showed that I understood similarities and universal values amongst individuals, but was still working on appreciating differences. Fast forward to my fourth year, when I had an opportunity to retake the IDI.  I was stunned when I reviewed my results.

A Better Version of Ourselves: The Intercultural Development Inventory

Written by Elizabeth Lynch '21
I hate tests. And medical schools seem to love tests. So, I should not have been surprised when a test was required during orientation at the Larner College of Medicine. But a test on my cultural identity and my “cross-cultural competence?” Clearly, I was going to fail medical school before getting to orientation.

The Navajo People and Rural Medicine

Written by Eric Schmidt '18
For the month of September, I embarked on the experience of a lifetime, living and working on the largest Native American reservation in the United States. Sprawled across the four corners region of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado, the Navajo Reservation in Chinle, Arizona, encompasses an area as large as the entire state of West Virginia. Its population, however, is only about 300,000, making it extremely rural.

A Look Back: Top Five Posts from the Larner College of Medicine Blog

Next week, the Larner College of Medicine welcomes the Class of 2021 to campus. As we begin another academic year, we wanted to take the opportunity to look back at the past year of writing from our students, and revisit some of the most popular blog posts. The top five most-viewed posts showcase the diversity of our students, as well as the energy and enthusiasm they bring to the field of medicine.