Social Medicine Consortium Campaign Against Racism

Written by Isi Beach '22
The Social Medicine Consortium is an international organization committed to educating those in the health professions on the social determinants of health. Currently, the Social Medicine Consortium is embarking on an exciting project known as the Campaign Against Racism, which, as its name suggests, is focused on fighting the different forms of racism that plague the medical profession around the globe.

Social Justice and Health Equity in Medical Education

Written by Christina Dawson '21, Sam Epstein '21 and Raghav Goyal '21
Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English’s 1975 book, Witches, Midwives, and Healers, was the first text that the Larner College of Medicine’s Social Justice Coalition discussed in October of 2017. This excerpt sets up our charge—despite its authoritative and evidence-based veneer, the underpinnings of medicine are highly political, social, and temporal.

Stay Creative, Find Your People, Fight for Social Justice

Written by Julia Shatten, M.D.'18
We are all sitting in the classroom, staring at the Powerpoint. Our eyes lock on the trajectory of a line graph. It increases a bit and then plummets. The graph we are staring at is a part of a lecture with some nebulous title like “Professionalism in Healthcare.” It is showing the results of a study that assessed the trajectory of empathy during medical school training.

Trust in Your Fellow Americans: Advocating for DREAMers

Written by Juan Conde '21
What is it like to be a student advocate, to rally for change in society, and to bring attention to the education struggles of undocumented youth? It can be difficult, at times uplifting and at other times dispiriting, but always, at least for me, it has been necessary. I know that most Larner College of Medicine students are passionate about different social issues. We have a tradition of advocacy for many worthy causes, such as expanding access to healthcare, improving health equity, and providing leadership in underserved communities.

Four Years Later: Cultural Understanding in Medical School

Written by Soraiya Thura '18
I’ve grown in many ways during my four years in medical school, but one of the most striking has been related to my cultural competence. When I took the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) as a first-year medical student, my results showed that I understood similarities and universal values amongst individuals, but was still working on appreciating differences. Fast forward to my fourth year, when I had an opportunity to retake the IDI.  I was stunned when I reviewed my results.