Commencement 2018: Medical School as a Musical

Written by Gayathri Prabhakar, M.D.'18
Now, reflecting back on the past four years, there are definitely song lyrics I could use to describe the different phases of our journey and a few lessons I have learned along the way that I’d like to share with you. I’ve also mentioned to a few of you that I used to sing in a previous life, so here’s your chance to hear that too. Bear with me.

What Doctors Can Learn from Nurses

Written by Laura Nelson '21
In the United States, we tend to subscribe to the belief that medicine is a hierarchy in which doctors call all of the shots. Nurses, in contrast, simply do as they are told. This assumption is deeply rooted in the patriarchal history of medicine, which has largely been rejected by modern practitioners in favor of a more progressive, team-based approach.

Ethics of the Theater: Ophthalmology in Uganda

Written by Julia Shatten '18
We flip the sheet over that we used for this patient in preparation for the next, a five year -old boy with a foreign body in the eye. He is too scared to lay down, so he sits playing with a toy piano on the operating table as the anesthesiologist administers the anesthesia. She catches him just in time, and lays him back. The rest of the operations that day were a blur.

Tips & Pointers for the Fourth-Year of Medical School

Written by Kelsey Sullivan '18
Starting fourth year of medical school is an exciting time. Here at the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, it is really the first time that you have a chance to customize your schedule to your unique interests and aspirations. There are a few things you should keep in mind when getting ready for that last year of your medical school journey.

Trust in Your Fellow Americans: Advocating for DREAMers

Written by Juan Conde '21
What is it like to be a student advocate, to rally for change in society, and to bring attention to the education struggles of undocumented youth? It can be difficult, at times uplifting and at other times dispiriting, but always, at least for me, it has been necessary. I know that most Larner College of Medicine students are passionate about different social issues. We have a tradition of advocacy for many worthy causes, such as expanding access to healthcare, improving health equity, and providing leadership in underserved communities.