My First Year as a Resident: A Sense of Shared Purpose

Written by Bryce Bludevich, M.D.'17
Almost every resident and attending will tell you that nothing prepares you for your first day of residency. I will tell you the same thing, but that said I have to admit that the Larner College of Medicine prepared me as well as possible. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of the residents and attendings at the University of Vermont Medical Center, I felt ready to start my intern year at UMass Memorial Medical Center.

Transforming Our Space to Support 100% Active Learning

Written by Larner College of Medicine Senior Associate Dean for Medical Education William Jeffries, Ph.D.
At a recent Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) national meeting I had the privilege of sharing the stage with my colleagues Dr. Kathryn Huggett, Assistant Dean and Teaching Academy Director and Jill Jemison, Chief Information Officer for Health Sciences. As one of three schools selected to present an Innovation Educational Space Transformation, The Larner College of Medicine had the opportunity to showcase the dynamic work happening here on campus to support active learning.

Four Years Later: Cultural Understanding in Medical School

Written by Soraiya Thura '18
I’ve grown in many ways during my four years in medical school, but one of the most striking has been related to my cultural competence. When I took the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) as a first-year medical student, my results showed that I understood similarities and universal values amongst individuals, but was still working on appreciating differences. Fast forward to my fourth year, when I had an opportunity to retake the IDI.  I was stunned when I reviewed my results.

A Better Version of Ourselves: The Intercultural Development Inventory

Written by Elizabeth Lynch '21
I hate tests. And medical schools seem to love tests. So, I should not have been surprised when a test was required during orientation at the Larner College of Medicine. But a test on my cultural identity and my “cross-cultural competence?” Clearly, I was going to fail medical school before getting to orientation.

The Navajo People and Rural Medicine

Written by Eric Schmidt '18
For the month of September, I embarked on the experience of a lifetime, living and working on the largest Native American reservation in the United States. Sprawled across the four corners region of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado, the Navajo Reservation in Chinle, Arizona, encompasses an area as large as the entire state of West Virginia. Its population, however, is only about 300,000, making it extremely rural.