Global Health

Cui Bono? Who Will Benefit?

Written by Katherine Wang ’17
It was the combination of Grey’s Anatomy and Mountains Beyond Mountains that convinced me my senior year of high school to consider medicine as a career—the excitement of the operating room and the journey Paul Farmer took through Haiti and beyond. It obviously was an idealized notion of both surgery and global health, but it shaped my undergraduate experience. I chose to major in anthropology, and enrolled in an introductory writing course in the subject after reading about it in Tracy Kidder’s book. Continue reading

Global Health

What Women Want During Labor: Cultural Competency in Uganda

Written by Janel Martir ’17
“What’s an epidural?” Phiona asked casually as she swayed toward the cabinet of binders in the International office at Makerere University holding her pregnant belly, her brow furrowed in obvious curiosity. Sruthi, one of the two medical students on the maternity wards with me, and I looked at each other, speechless. We fumbled, unsure of where to begin. Epidural is a word with deep cultural and visceral resonance among women in the United States. Even nulliparous women (medical jargon for women who have never experienced labor) joke behind closed doors—”I’m so getting an epidural”—before bursting into fits of laughter when the topic of possible or future childbirth slips into the conversation. Continue reading

Global Health

A Cracked Door: Global Health Rotation at Cho Ray Hospital

Written by Saraga Reddy ’18
Let me preface this post with noting that Cho Ray hospital delivers a very high standard of care to its patients despite somewhat limited resources. The doctors and medical students in the Pulmonary department have taught and challenged us with a generosity that overwhelms me. And every upsetting moment that has caught me off guard, whether inside the hospital or outside, has been balanced two fold with a moment of kindness or humor. Continue reading

Global Health

Transforming How We Think About Global Health Education

Written by Stefan Wheat ’18
I sat in the clinic working on the multiplication table problems my mom had assigned me earlier that morning. Working next to the patients waiting to see my parents, I tried not to let myself become distracted by the elderly Nepali women who liked running their grubby old fingers through my blonde hair. When it was a busy day in the clinic and we had to stay late, my dad would give me a writing assignment to pass the time. People would walk for days to visit the clinic my parents ran in Bandipur, in the foothills of the Himalaya. They were the only physicians for nearly a 50 mile radius, so I tended to get a lot of writing assignments. Continue reading

Global Health

Lessons from Uganda: Improving Care for Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities Around the World

Written by Tamar Goldberg, M.D. ’15
I climb into a “matatu” shared taxi van on my way home after a long day at Mulago Hospital. The paved roads are coated with orange-red sand and filled with other matatus with their religious slogans pasted across their front or rear windows. Boda boda motor cycles and pedestrians crowd the streets. People yell “muzungo, muzungo” (the Luganda word for white person) at me as we drive by, and the children walking home in their school uniforms wave and laugh. The roads are lined with yellow MTN umbrella stands where you can buy minutes for your phone, furniture stands selling huge arm chairs, and carts filled with jackfruit, plantains, and mangoes. Continue reading