The Homestay Model of Global Health Science

Video by Kapo Productions
The University of Vermont/Western Connecticut Health Network Global Health Program has a robust partnership with Makerere University College of Health Sciences and Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda. Learn more about the homestay model visiting medical students experience and meet some of the people who make it happen in this short documentary.

Cui Bono? Who Will Benefit?

Written by Katherine Wang '17 It was the combination of Grey’s Anatomy and Mountains Beyond Mountains that convinced me my senior year of high school to consider medicine as a career—the excitement of the operating room and the journey Paul Farmer took through Haiti and beyond. It obviously was an idealized notion of both surgery and global health, but it shaped my undergraduate experience. I chose to major in anthropology, and enrolled in an introductory writing course in the subject after reading about it in Tracy Kidder’s book.

What Women Want During Labor: Cultural Competency in Uganda

Written by Janel Martir '17 “What’s an epidural?” Phiona asked casually as she swayed toward the cabinet of binders in the International office at Makerere University holding her pregnant belly, her brow furrowed in obvious curiosity. Sruthi, one of the two medical students on the maternity wards with me, and I looked at each other, speechless. We fumbled, unsure of where to begin. Epidural is a word with deep cultural and visceral resonance among women in the United States. Even nulliparous women (medical jargon for women who have never experienced labor) joke behind closed doors—”I’m so getting an epidural”—before bursting into fits of laughter when the topic of possible or future childbirth slips into the conversation.

A Cracked Door: Global Health Rotation at Cho Ray Hospital

Written by Saraga Reddy '18 Let me preface this post with noting that Cho Ray hospital delivers a very high standard of care to its patients despite somewhat limited resources. The doctors and medical students in the Pulmonary department have taught and challenged us with a generosity that overwhelms me. And every upsetting moment that has caught me off guard, whether inside the hospital or outside, has been balanced two fold with a moment of kindness or humor.