What Doctors Can Learn from Nurses

Written by Laura Nelson '21
In the United States, we tend to subscribe to the belief that medicine is a hierarchy in which doctors call all of the shots. Nurses, in contrast, simply do as they are told. This assumption is deeply rooted in the patriarchal history of medicine, which has largely been rejected by modern practitioners in favor of a more progressive, team-based approach.

Tips & Pointers for the Fourth-Year of Medical School

Written by Kelsey Sullivan '18
Starting fourth year of medical school is an exciting time. Here at the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, it is really the first time that you have a chance to customize your schedule to your unique interests and aspirations. There are a few things you should keep in mind when getting ready for that last year of your medical school journey.

Match Day 2018 at the Larner College of Medicine

Match Day – the annual rite of passage that ignites a senior medical student’s future – took place on Friday, March 16, 2018. Beginning at noon EDT, medical students in the University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine’s Class of 2018 and soon-to-be-doctors from across the U.S. and world learned which U.S. residency program they have been matched to for the next three to seven years.

Shaping Medical Education: How Students are Leading the Way

Written by Audrea Bose '21 & Sidney Hilker '21
When we were applying to medical school, we imagined that our early months would involve a lot of time taking notes in lecture and studying material from PowerPoint slides or text books. But instead, we spend our days going through real patient cases with small groups of students and faculty. While learning about the circulatory system, we learned how to listen for heart sounds with standardized patients. Most weeks we have team-based learning sessions where we are asked to debate clinical scenarios using the information we have learned with our classmates.

Four Years Later: Cultural Understanding in Medical School

Written by Soraiya Thura '18
I’ve grown in many ways during my four years in medical school, but one of the most striking has been related to my cultural competence. When I took the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) as a first-year medical student, my results showed that I understood similarities and universal values amongst individuals, but was still working on appreciating differences. Fast forward to my fourth year, when I had an opportunity to retake the IDI.  I was stunned when I reviewed my results.