Shaping Medical Education: How Students are Leading the Way

Written by Audrea Bose '21 & Sidney Hilker '21
When we were applying to medical school, we imagined that our early months would involve a lot of time taking notes in lecture and studying material from PowerPoint slides or text books. But instead, we spend our days going through real patient cases with small groups of students and faculty. While learning about the circulatory system, we learned how to listen for heart sounds with standardized patients. Most weeks we have team-based learning sessions where we are asked to debate clinical scenarios using the information we have learned with our classmates.

Four Years Later: Cultural Understanding in Medical School

Written by Soraiya Thura '18
I’ve grown in many ways during my four years in medical school, but one of the most striking has been related to my cultural competence. When I took the Intercultural Development Inventory (IDI) as a first-year medical student, my results showed that I understood similarities and universal values amongst individuals, but was still working on appreciating differences. Fast forward to my fourth year, when I had an opportunity to retake the IDI.  I was stunned when I reviewed my results.

A Better Version of Ourselves: The Intercultural Development Inventory

Written by Elizabeth Lynch '21
I hate tests. And medical schools seem to love tests. So, I should not have been surprised when a test was required during orientation at the Larner College of Medicine. But a test on my cultural identity and my “cross-cultural competence?” Clearly, I was going to fail medical school before getting to orientation.

The Navajo People and Rural Medicine

Written by Eric Schmidt '18
For the month of September, I embarked on the experience of a lifetime, living and working on the largest Native American reservation in the United States. Sprawled across the four corners region of Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and Colorado, the Navajo Reservation in Chinle, Arizona, encompasses an area as large as the entire state of West Virginia. Its population, however, is only about 300,000, making it extremely rural.

Launching the American Public Health Association Student Interest Group

Written by Carolyn Payne '18
The American Public Health Association (APHA) is developing a presence at The University of Vermont (UVM). In January, a group of medical students founded the American Public Health Association Student Interest Group (APHA SIG) at the Larner College of Medicine. This was an important step towards ensuring the engagement of Vermont students in community education, political advocacy, and state and national public health initiatives.