Latest Entries
Education

Seeing Medicine from the Patient’s Point of View

Written by Sunit Misra ’19
As one of the first participants in the UVM Larner College of Medicine’s Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship (LIC) I have the luxury of connecting with my patients beyond a single encounter. The focus of this program, completed during the third year of medical school, is to gain the perspective of the patient, and see medicine from their point of view. Instead of the traditional block format, where students complete rotations in seven different medical specialties, we choose a panel of patients… Continue reading

Student Life

What Birds Teach Me about Medicine

Written by Miles Grunvald ’18
It’s not unusual for medical students to experience periods of painful self-doubt, unrelenting exhaustion and, at times, shear disappointment. I, like many of my colleagues, have occasionally experienced such emotions and have been fortunate in their brevity. During these low times I would often cope by making the facetious claim to my significant other that I was going to drop out of medical school and become a birder. Continue reading

Guest Blog Posts

Honoring Our Surgical Heritage: The Inaugural Catamount Surgeon Award

Written by UVM Professor of Surgery Frank Ittleman, M.D.
On January 20, 2017, Richard Gamelli, M.D.’74, professor emeritus at Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, received the inaugural Catamount Surgeon Award from the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont. The award celebrates Dr. Gamelli’s many important contributions to the field. UVM Professor of Surgery Frank Ittleman, M.D., delivered the following remarks at the awards ceremony. Continue reading

Guest Blog Posts

“Fake News” or Reputable Science? How to Tell the Difference

Written by UVM Associate Dean for Public Health
Jan Carney, M.D., MPH

By now, we have all heard of “fake news,” but what about “fake science news” – does it exist and how can we differentiate between fact and fiction? In January 2017, The Los Angeles Times wrote about epidemic spread of “fake news” to science and medicine. In February, Academic Medicine sounded a warning to academics everywhere about predatory publishing, an exploding and distracting publication practice characterized by “weak peer review, sloppy science, or even fraud.” Continue reading